Collaboration to Support Students with Chronic Health Conditions

Collaboration Background

It is estimated that one in four students in United States schools may have a chronic health condition (Jackson, Vann, Kotch, Pahel, & Lee, 2011; Van Cleave, Gortmaker, & Perrin, 2010). Approximately 6% of those students have multiple chronic conditions leading to challenges with treatment adherence, disease acceptance, lifestyle modification, care coordination, increased exposure to chronic condition risk factors, and difficulties transitioning to adult healthcare settings (Anderson, 2010; Rezaee & Pollock, 2015). Children with chronic conditions are at risk for high absentee rates, low student engagement, dropping-out of school, exposure to bullying, disruptive behaviors, poor grades, and below-average performance on standardized achievement tests (Forrest, Bevans, Riley, Crespo, & Louis, 2011; Bethell et al., 2012).

The school nurse is well positioned to support the health and academic success of students with chronic health conditions by providing direct care and facilitating the many practice components of care coordination (Bargeron et al., 2015; Brook et al., 2015; NASN 2015). School nurse advocacy helps students and families to access needed resources in support of academic achievement (CDC, 2017). School nurses are leaders who provide care coordination, health education and promotion, quality improvement, and critical thinking skills that benefit schools, families, the healthcare system, and most importantly children with chronic health conditions.

The key resources here support the school nurse leadership role in building school communities through collaboration with state and local health and education leaders. Advancing the leadership role of school nurses optimizes the health and learning of students with chronic health conditions. Please share your feedback using the comment area below.  You may also contact NASN's Director of Nursing Education Nichole Bobo at nbobo@nasn.org.

Professional Practice Evidence

National Association of School Nurses

Framework for 21st Century School Nursing PracticeTM

Position Statement: Diabetes Management in the School Setting

Position Statement: Individualized Healthcare Plans: The Role of the School Nurse

Position Statement: Nursing Delegation to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in the School Setting

Position Statement: Role of the 21st Century School Nurse

Position Statement: The Role of the School Nurse in Telehealth

Position Statement: Students with Chronic Health Conditions: The Role of the School Nurse

Position Statement: Transition Planning for Students with Chronic Health Conditions

Position Statement: The Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child: Implications for 21st Century School Nurses

American Academy of Pediatrics

Position Statement: Role of the School Nurse in Providing School Health Services

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Research Brief: Addressing the Needs of Students with Chronic Health Conditions: Strategies for Schools

Research Brief: Chronic Health Conditions and Academic Achievement

Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child Model

Resources and Continuing Education

National Association of School Nurses

The Role of IHPs in Care Coordination for Students with Chronic Health Conditions 

Evidence-based Practice Tip Sheet

Presentation Tips for Using Data

Tips for Data Use

Partnership Building to Support Students Manage Chronic Health Conditions: 1.0 CNE

Care Coordination for Students with Diabetes: 1.0 CNE

Helping Administer to the Needs of the Student with Diabetes in School: 6.5 CNE

Focus on the Framework-Care Coordination live program: 6.5 CNE coming soon

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

School Health Index  

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBSS) 

School Health Profiles 

Parent/Family Engagement

Parents for Healthy Schools 

National Association of Chronic Disease Directors

School Health Publications

Best Practice for Chronic Health Conditions

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This online resource is supported in part by Supported in part by Cooperative Agreement Number, DP16-1601 NU1ADP003090, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.